First Aid Treatment to Dog’s Paw Pads

pet dog

It is difficult to treat paw pad injuries. Paw pads undergo constant pressure and friction because the paw supports the weight of your dog while walking, and it isn’t easy to clean as well. For paw pad injuries, there can be some delays in the healing because dogs always tend to lick their paws. Make sure that you know the basic pet first aid for minor injury situations.

Assist Your Dog

Each dog can respond uniquely to each treatment because dogs are individually different. We must have our veterinarians check our injured dogs because minor injuries can sometimes result in bad infections.

Wash with Soap

Wash the paw pad with antibacterial soap properly to avoid infections of the paw pad. Check for the paw pads for any embedded objects or thorns and then, carefully remove it. Place the paws in Epsom salts mixed in water for fifteen minutes.

Prevent Infection by Disinfection

Dry the paw pad and ensure that it is clean. Use a cotton ball and Betadine to disinfect the paw pad or use a sterile saline solution and allow the disinfectant to air dry properly.

Use Neosporin to prevent infection of the injured paw pad. Make sure that your dog does not lick it off because the paw must absorb the medication. Protect the paw of your dog and keep an eye on it so that your pet cannot access it. You can try using a piece of clean cloth and wrap it around the affected area.

Train Your Dog

Use gauze to make a cushion on the paw pad and to keep the wound clean. Use a self-adhering bandage to secure the gauze so your dog can walk on it. Keep an eye on your dog and prevent your dog from eating any foreign materials for avoiding any dangerous situation. Remove the gauze now and then so that the wound can heal faster by air-drying the injury. You should train your dog to leave their injuries by distracting them by giving them a chew toy or bone.

Use E-Collars

Invest in an e-collar if your dog persists in licking their paws. This collar is conical in shape and prevents their dogs from turning their heads to lick or chew around their wounds. Your dog might be uncomfortable at first, but eventually, he will get used to it later. When your dogs are unattended, they can remove their bandages by chewing on them and licking at their paws. Make sure to monitor them closely to prevent them from removing the bandages on their paws.